There’s a new voice in the national debate over health care reform: the fast-talking, wonky Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. Following his disastrous response to President Obama earlier this year, Jindal hasn’t been seen on the national stage. Jindal told The Advocate he recently turned down several requests for interviews from national networks to focus on the legislative session at home but now feels compelled to speak out about his concerns with national Democrats’ health care ideas. While Louisiana ranks at or near the bottom of most state rankings in health care, Jindal has pushed for reform efforts and has a solid resume on health care policy: he previously served as Louisiana health secretary, assistant Health and Human Services secretary in the Bush administration, and executive director of the National Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare in 1998.

In an op-ed piece published yesterday in Politico, “A trillion here, a trillion there,” Jindal writes, “I know a little something about health care policy and I can tell you exactly the game that is currently afoot. If the House Democrats’ plan were to become law, the president’s statement that ‘if you like your health care now, you can keep it’ will not be true. This is not an opinion, this is a fact.” He also blasts national Democrats on economic and energy policy:
“Oops, I almost forgot the new national energy tax that just passed the House. If it isn’t bad enough that you may have lost your job and been fighting off foreclosure, the government now wants to make sure you, and every other American, pay more in energy costs so former Vice President Al Gore can be happy. This here is a fine pot of gumbo.”
Jindal followed up last night with an appearance on Fox News' The Sean Hannity Show. Today he’s scheduled to make appearances on both CNN and Fox News. There’s also reportedly a Wall Street Journal op-ed coming this week. Here’s the video from Hannity:

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