Leslie Turk’s characterization of Louisiana State Newspapers properties not being known for quality journalism begs the question of when did the alternative press become experts in that field (“Chain Reaction,” Jan. 21).

The 30-odd papers in the LSN family are not guided by any all-knowing person in the corporate tower. They are produced weekly, semi-weekly or daily by individual editors and their staffs, each attempting to reflect in their pages events and affairs important or interesting to their readers.

Their stories do not have the option of containing either opinion or theory on the part of the reporter and/or editor involved. Those matters, evidently contrary to your policy, are left to the editorial pages.

The unfounded statement that “that’s not the kind of local ownership that would be good for this community, as the Moody papers aren’t known for their quality journalism either” smacks of elitism from those who toil in larger communities on larger papers and therefore assume because they are larger they are better.

Dominick Cross was gone before my association with LSN began. I congratulate him on landing the editor’s post on what journalists in our region consider hallowed ground. While working at the Alexandria newspaper I had the privilege of working with two veterans of Hodding Carter’s newsroom.

Your article notes that the Delta Democrat Times is a Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper. If Mr. Cross or Ms. Turk would like to see what that prize medallion looks like, drop by and I’ll show you mine. No appointment is necessary.

To post a comment, please log into your IND account. If you do not have an account, click the "register" button to create one. Facebook comments can be used as an alternative to creating an account at theIND.com.

LA LA Land
Advertisement

Read the Flipping Paper!

Click Here for the Entire Print Version of
IND Monthly
Advertisement
Advertisement